Subsurface Utility Engineering 101

Apr 21, 2016

 
Trisha D. Frederick, P.E., MBA, LEEP AP
Utility Engineer

Need to learn more about Subsurface Utility Engineering, commonly referred to as SUE?

Imagine this. You are the project manager for a roadway project. It was advertised to the public that the roadway would be done in January, and it is now June. Six months behind schedule and the project is not complete. Home and business owners are upset because of the backed up traffic, and everyone is looking to you for an answer. View Full Post


Remote Sensing Applications in GIS

Apr 16, 2016


Chris Shannon, P.E., CFM
Division Manager - Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide the ability to build and maintain an inventory of anything on the earth or any information that is tied to a location. One may ask the question – Why is GIS important? Simply put, because location matters.  View Full Post


Structures Need Rehab - Part 1

Oct 14, 2015


Corbett Freeman, P.E.

Money for infrastructure always seems to be scarce, but our great “Bayou City” continues to grow and, at the same time, continues to age. Without needs-based programs like ReBuild Houston that prioritize replacement of crumbling infrastructure, a full eighty percent of drainage structures and streets will outlive their useful life in the next 20 years. Nationally, the last increase in the gas tax, which generally pays for our transportation system, was over 20 years ago. That bill, however, was passed to balance the budget, not to pay for new and replacement infrastructure.  View Full Post


The Final “Waters of the United States” Rule…Maybe

Sep 15, 2015

full service engineering and surveying firm
Susan Alford - President of Berg Oliver Associates, Inc.

On August 28, 2015, the EPA pushed forward, with the Final Waters of the United States (WOTUS) Rule, its attempt to clarify jurisdictional limits covered under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act and how they are defined.

Attempt is as gracious of a term as I can use.  View Full Post


Municipal Utility Districts (MUD) 101

Sep 02, 2015

full service engineering and surveying firm
Jon VanderWilt, P.E.
 
Why create a MUD? We all know the answer to that question. Property taxes from developed land pays for water, sewer and drainage improvements. Lately, the list has grown to include roads and parks, too.

There is no place in the world I would rather be than Houston, Texas. It is the greatest place in the world to live, work, and raise a family. All of us involved in the business of working with MUDs are the privileged few that have the opportunity and honor, on a daily basis, to create neighborhoods from farmland, pastures, and forests, making it possible for others to live in the greatest place in the world. I thank God every day for this opportunity and enjoy it so much that I can't call it "work." View Full Post


Environmental Due Diligence

Sep 01, 2015

full service engineering and surveying firm Environmental Due Diligence 
Susan Alford - President of Berg Oliver Associates, Inc.

The first question most folks ask about environmental studies in the due diligence period of a project is...WHY do I need to?

To address WHY is simple: compliance with State and Federal Law. President Nixon signed the Environmental Policy Act of 1969 on January 1, 1970. Subsequently, federal and state regulations to protect natural resources such as wetlands, waters, and threatened species, to protect cultural resources, and to protect human health from hazardous material exposure were enacted. I won’t bore you with all of the acronyms, chapter, verse or title of each Code of Federal Regulations or Texas Administrative Code. View Full Post


Detention 101: Detention vs. Retention

Jun 22, 2015

full service engineering and surveying firm Detention vs. Retention
Lacey Bodnar, E.I.T., CFM
 
While detention and retention may sound the same, the terms cannot be used interchangeably. Detention and retention both refer to storing rain water on-site during a storm event, when the risk of flooding is highest. The difference is that when water is detained, it is slowly released into a stream or river and leaves the site. When water is retained, it is not intended to leave the site. Instead, it is infiltrated into the ground or evapo-transpired into the air.  View Full Post


Do You Live in a Flood Plain?

May 26, 2015

Do You Live in a Flood Plain 
Greg Frank, P.E., CFM

"I’m not in a flood plain…or am I?"

Unfortunately this question is way too timely. Many Houstonians may have thought they were not in a floodplain, and yet found their homes underwater this past week.  I attend several flood plain related conferences each year and this question is asked by any number of speakers.  Each time, only a few of us raise our hands, after all we ARE flood plain managers and flood control engineers, so we should know better, right?  But the brutal truth is that we are ALL living in a flood plain of some sort.  I like to use the analogy ‘Noah built the ark for a reason… it rained for forty days and forty nights’. View Full Post


Irrigation and Conservation

Oct 14, 2014

 Irrigation and Conservation

Dustin O'Neal, P.E.

 

Ever wonder how much water your lawn needs at any given time?  The amount of irrigation needed for a healthy, drought-resistant lawn fluctuates weekly due to rainfall and temperature dependent evapotranspiration.

 

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